JuiceWRLD’s Untimely Death Shocks Loyola Community

JuiceWRLD had a massive impact on the culture and music as a whole. Here’s how Loyola students are reacting to his death

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JuiceWRLD’s Untimely Death Shocks Loyola Community

Kevin Duffy, Writer

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Jarad Anthony Higgins, better known to us as “JuiceWRLD” passed away early Sunday morning at the age of 21. It’s safe to say that Juice WRLD, a rapper from right here in Chicago, had an unquestioned impact on many who listened to his music. He first popped onto the scene on SoundCloud in 2015, but gained a large and strong following in 2017 after releasing his hit singles “Lucid Dreams” and “All Girls are the Same.”

Influences on Juice WRLD’s music range wide and far, from hip-hop

contemporaries to classic rock. His music has been branded as “emo” “rock” and “genre-bending.” JuiceWRLD arguably garnered more success in the “emo-rap” subgenre than any other artist, and was known for his unique style of blending dark sounds with lyrics that conjure up feelings like heartbreak, loneliness, and isolation. 

Among students at Loyola, many found his music to be inspiring, calming, and comforting. “I loved his music, it just felt so unique and different from all the other artists out there” said JuiceWRLD fan, and Loyola senior Tyler Flores. Tyler’s sentiment about the late rapper is not unique. 

“His music comforted me. Sometimes it’s hard because we look up to celebrities and famous artists, but it’s important to remember that they’re people too. His music made me remember that I’m not alone when I’m going through a rough patch” said senior Emilio Leone. Students are organizing a memorial to take place within the next couple days, for Loyola fans of his to remember his work and say a few words.

JuiceWRLD’s career was just taking off, and he had many years of valuable musical contributions left in him. His musical style, inspiring lyrics, and presence will be missed by the music community, and by many students here at Loyola Academy. Gone too soon. RIP.